Schizophrenia Awareness Day

Schiz01Hello everyone.

First off, “thank you” to the person whose response on finding Neurolations was: “It’s very green, isn’t it?” That put a grin on my face.

A bit of an early post this month. 9th May is Schizophrenia Awareness Day.

Definitition

To have a “schizo” (split) “phrenia” (the mind). N.B: A split personality it is NOT!

Historically, the mind also includes the heart – as the home of the emotions. And as we all know, it is the emotions (and sometimes the lack of them) that drive thought. No, I’m not saying schizophrenics don’t have a heart! I’m saying, their ways of thinking are disjointed because of how their emotional systems function.

Let’s Shred Some Myths
  • It is a collection of various symptoms; not a single condition.
  • Symptoms described as “postive” & “negative” are neither good nor bad; it’s “positive” & “negative” in the sense of plus and minus. A psychological delusion is an example of an additional symptom because it is not an every day experience. A negative example might be that the syndrome has taken away a passion a person once had for say, architecture.
  • Schizophrenic symptoms are normal human experiences. It’s just that sufferers experience of them are extreme and intense. For example, and this is just a general example of being human, every one of us has an average body temperature (37 ºc). But we also experience a hot sweat after exercising. And we shiver to raise our temperature back to normal after a cold swim.
  • People living with schizophrenia do not need to be institutionalised. With the right balance of the right medication and counselling, they can live reasonably normal lives.

FeltSense1

Click here to learn more of what it can be really like living with schizophrenia. Courtesy of the charity, Mind, it’s a group having a chat over a cuppa. (6½ min’s approx.)

Why 9th May?

On 9 May 1970, “The Times” published an article by retired university professor, John Pringle. His son had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The article asked for action to be taken to improve support for those living with schizophrenia themselves, and the advice available to those caring for them.

More than 400 readers answered the call, and in 1972, the National Schizophrenia Fellowship was born. Today though the Fellowship has evolved into four charities across the UK. In alphabetical order, they are:-

Please take a look.

That’s it for another month. Take care.

How Are We All Doing?

Hello, everyone.

It’s no fun being in the house all day, every day. Only the delivery person and occassional neighbour provide face-to-face human contact.  If exercising in the outside world for thirty minutes is possible, its around the same place – no change of scenery.

I’ve been doing a shorthand version of the SMART technique this past month in lockdown. I’ve been what I call “SAG-ing”: Setting myself a Small Achievable Goal once a day.

Online Wordsearch

The other day I went online with the goal of setting someone a wordsearch to do. I went to a site called “The Word Search”. (As they say, it is what it says on the tin.) The site’s “maker” page helped me.

I gave my wordsearch a title, added a small description of my design’s topic, and listed 30 words for my friend to look for. There was no need to grid the letters myself; the website did it for me.

Then it was my turn to complete the wordsearch made for me. It was good fun seeing who could do whose quicker.

What Else?

Whatever you think of, let it be something do-able, requiring just enough effort to give yourself a sense of success. Here’s a link to a fellow brain injury survivor with her own tips for how to cope. Her name is Anne Johnston. (Approx. 9 minutes)

I will say that Anne refers to going to the gym’ and the online workouts that people are streaming. Not everyone is so nimble and co-ordinated to be able to do that. But I agree with her, it is important to physically exercise as much as possible.

Mods and rockers fight, Brighton 1964

Chairobics

No, not quite as in the picture. (This is part of Stanley Cohen’s study into how newspapers etc create “moral panics” by the media – the mods and rockers at Brighton, to be exact.)

No. Click here for some exercises for wheelchair users. By the groovy electropop beats and rythmn it’s a proper 1980s workout. It certainly looks dated. But it’s still worthy of a look.

Quick Update

Just to let you all know before signing off, I’m in the middle of an online course on e-counselling. Fingers crossed, I will soon feel fully competent at telephone and email counselling if not video. Obviously, I’ll let you know when.

Bye for now. And please stay safe!

Sean

Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy – Companionship & Competition

Two Pronged Brain

Last month I talked of the two ways in which C.R.T. can be given – “Comprehensive” and “Modular”. My personal opinion is that a combination of both helps individuals most. This was following a conversation with someone wanting to help their family member directly.

I hope the link to Dr. Judd’s expertise was useful.

Nowthen, as it’s Christmas, I thought it might be an idea to look at some of the online resources available. There’s stuff out there, some even quite fun, that everyone can challenge each other at.

(“Restorative”)

It’s best to see this often used term as an intention, not a promise. It is used to describe exercises designed to improve precise areas of brain function. For an idea of the different options available online, click here for Phone Arena.Com’s view of their “Top 5” brain training sites. (Just under 4 minutes.) (As always, you may want to skip the ad’.)

(Neuronation)

Not saying it’s the best. Neuronation is the site I’ve most experience with. You can find your own favourite.

The first thing to do is register an email address and password to log on with. The first thing that will greet you will be three choices of subscription: 1. £11 for three months; 2. £5 for twelve months or 3. £299 for a lifetime access to all the games. But as with most things of this nature, you’ll get a free sample of tasters.

To gain access to these free samples, click the “Training” header at the top of the page. The next gives the options of “Daily Training” or “Exercises”.

On your first visit, I suggest you go straight to the exercises. These include a free exercise or two in the following catagories: “Numeracy”; “Language”; “Reasoning”; “Memory” and “Perception”.

Have a practice at each. You can time yourself, but I’d suggest building your confidence by having a go in “Learning Mode”. Pick a catagory; pick an exercise; choose the “Tutorial”; click the “Learning Mode”.

Neuronation monitors and charts your level of performance. At any time, when fatigue or boredom strike, you can come out of your chosen exercise.

Whether you’re wanting something to do yourself, or get to know and help your familiar-cum-new member of your family, these online products are a good way of doing it.

Wishing you progress throughout 2020. And a Christmas as best as best can be.

Sean

Xmas2020

Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy – The Two Pronged Way

Two Pronged Brain

Here at last! I thought I was never going to get this uploaded. And still in November too.

Let’s turn our attention back to Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy (C.R.T.)

Why?

  1. We haven’t talked about C.R.T. for a long time.
  2. Someone recently asked what they could do at home to help their loved-one themselves. (I’ve found a Youtube post that should help. See below.)
(Definition)

There are many. It seems every organisation the world over has its own description of what CRT is. Here’s my “in a nutshell” definition:-

Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy is a collaborative series of tasks and discussions between therapist(s) and patient(s) / client(s) aimed at helping those patient(s) / client(s) cope with themselves and the wider world after a brain injury.

The implication for Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapists, be they grounded in classical Cognitive therapies or Person-centred therapies, is that C.R.T. involves both active listening and active thinking.

What do I mean by “active thinking”? I mean empathically thinking as the client thinks.

Art of cinversation

(Comprehensive)

Cognitive Rehab’ Therapy takes a two pronged approach. The Person-centred or “Multi-modal” (“Comprehensive”) prong takes account of emotions, behaviour and perceptions altogether.  Active listening flags up the patient’s / client’s motivation or lack of it – gauges what stimulates by whatever degree and how. A therapist can then intuit techniques and interventions to best aid the patient’s / client’s understanding and skills.

The relationship is one of observation – reflection or open question – reaction – observation – response. Such in-the-moment to-ing and fro’-ing between therapist and patient / client can result in unforeseen recognitions. I’m talking about immeasurable and surprising reconnections and new connections within the “neuro-person”, if I may call them that.

(Modular)

The Modular prong is more targeted. Its focus is on areas of damaged brain, not always the holistic person. Formulated exercises are aimed at improving attention, memory, visual and information processing, language or executive functions.

Single modules can be used for an isolated or overriding impairment. Selected modules can be used in group settings or tailored to individual patients / clients. Though less precise in delivery, modular, task orientated group therapy helps in the following ways:-

  • By facilitating peer support.
  • Problem solving by discussion gives greater chance to strengthen confidence, co-operation, as well as some empathy.
  • Less rigid, more flexible problem solving skills – “thinking sideways” also has greater chances to develop.
(Family Involvement)

How about that Youtube link? Clinical neuropsychologist, Tedd Judd, PhD. offers family members advice on how to approach helping a brain injured loved-one. (8.5 minutes.) Click here to watch. (Skip the advert.)

There is every reason to include family members in therapy when and where appropriate and possible.

When couple counselling I find it helps the couple best if we view their relationship as the client. Thinking sideways, it’s not difficult to shift this way of working to a wider family context. After all, it’s the relationship with and around a loved one with the acquired brain injury that needs to readjustment as much as A.B.I. survivor themselves.

More next month. Take care for now.

Action for Brain Injury Week 2019

Hello, everyone.

20th -26th May 2019 is “Action for Brain Injury Week”. Activities aimed at raising public awareness of the effects of brain injury, and the dangers, will be held. Headway is the force behind it, and its branches will be holding Hats for Headway up, down and sideways across the UK. Find out more by clicking the poster.hats-for-headway-poster-2019

As this year’s theme spotlights fatigue, I may as well throw my hat into the proverbial ring and talk about fatigue in this month’s post. My neurologist once said to me: “Sean, you can do most of what people can do. It’s just that what they do on one Mars bar, you can do on two.” So here’s an example of how fatigue gets to me – what takes me from over-tiredness to being on top of things again.

This week I’ve taken a few days off from my day job. (I know we’ve just had Easter, but hey, I was doing Easter type things.) The day job often tires me out. There are times I return home and doze on the sofa before I’ve the energy to do anything else.

The house being a bit of a mess despite help, I’ve chosen to use the time to get a few outstanding chores done. To help myself, I’ve written a “to-do” list with reminders on my mobile for each day.

Today’s To-Do

7am to 8am = Emails; letters; catch up on yesterday’s journal (1 hour reminder)

8:29am 8:31am = Med’s (Daily 1 minute reminder)

9:30am to 10:50am = Trip to shops etc. (3 hour reminder)

11am to 11:15am = Make important phone (15 minute reminder)

11:15am to 11:30am = Coffee & Kit Kat (1 minute reminder)

11:35am to 12:35pm = Filing (10 minute reminder)

12:40pm to 1pm = Lunch (10 minute reminder)

1pm to 3pm = Blog (10 minute reminder)

3pm to 3:20pm = Break (10 minute reminder)

3:50pm to 5:30pm = Blog (10 minute reminder)Snoozing brain

5:40pm to  6pm = Snooze / read (15 minute reminder)

6:10pm to 6:30pm = Get ready for evening out with friends (1 minute reminder)

Thinking Behind It

Knowing what I’m like, I factored in some safeguards to help keep my cool, not get wound up if Life, if not my self did not keep to my time-plan. Let’s face it, the real world is filled with delays and “unforeseen circumstances”.

Note my reminders to myself. I’m not as good at waking up as I once was. My mobile actually bleeped my need to be at my computer at 6am – 1 hour before hand; I’d set myself a 1 hour “window” to psyche myself up to the reality of getting out of bed.

Be gentle with yourself when doing your own list.

I also planned breaks at times close to my daily routine at work. This has put me in a business-like frame of mind. (Parent ego state, to reference last month’s post.) Pacing is a must.

Here’s a presentation I Googled you might find helpful: “There is Nothing Lazy About Someone with A Brain Injury” by Adasm Anicich.

What Happened

I got up at 7:30, so already I was behind what I’d intended. Thankfully, a letter I needed to compose was a virtual repetition of what I’d written a year ago. I just needed to change the date and a couple of other things and print off an updated version. After the usual showering and breakfast toutine, I left home half an hour later than planned.

But what I needed to do took less time than I thought. And my return bus stood waiting for a driver at the stop. (Good luck happens too.)

My point is: Be SOFTLY regimental.

Today I got all I needed to do at my computer. When I made my phone call I did not get an answer, even though I tried twice. I got through a big bit of my filing and I’ve completed this post to you on time, on the 15th of May. I’m happy.

Until next month, take care.

 

 

 

Panic Buttons for A.B.I.

This month I’ve been asked to write about panic attacks. Wow! I thought. Why haven’t I covered it before? When any of us are unable to think straight, our biology, our emotions carry us along.

Where they carry us, we don’t know until we stop, draw breath and take in what we can of our situation. Up until that point, we don’t know which direction we’re taking ourselves. We become proverbial “headless chickens”.

Before any compensatory therapy or strategy can prove useful, Step One has to be a willingness to face fears. This is most true of clients whose cognitive functioning can be problematic, even on the happier days.

TV Static

The clouding of consciousness (brain fog) is for ABI clients / patients, physical. In a lot of cases it does not go away. Emotions determine the degree of cloud cover, but it’s always there to be lived with.

Another way to describe an injured brain might be as a faulty TV set. I am reminded of Sunday mornings I spent many, many years ago – playing around with the aerial of my parents’ gogglebox – trying to get an undistorted picture of the BBC test card before “Mr. Benn” started.

As therapists, the most we can do is reduce the amount of static and suggest positions the aerial might work better. The aerial’s actual positioning to stabilise their picture behind their static is our clients’ job.

There is no real, by the book, “how to…” with this. In my view, it has to be person-centred. Here‘s a link to Part One of a counselling session (not one of mine) with a head injured client. It lasts 9 or so minutes.

N.B. The client reports being “snappy”, NOT “panicky”.

Panic Button Controls
  • DON’T FIGHT, TAKE FLIGHT. Remove yourself from the environment / situation causing your panic.
  • Find somewhere you can be safe and quiet.
  • Begin listening to your own breathing, taking slow, deep breathsABI and Panic
  • Close your eyes and, if possible, imagine you’re in your favourite surroundings, doing a favourite thing.
  • If imagining you are somewhere else is impossible for you, hold an object in both hands and look at it. Keep listening to your breathing as you notice each of the object’s details – shape, colour, texture, markings…
  • Keep practicing. Set a special time and place aside for yourself.

Reading what to do might be easy. Remembering and doing it, as we all know, is hard. It helps most to be with someone while you practice.

Click here for Part Two of the counselling session. Again, not a counselling session of mine. Part Two also lasts around 9 minutes.

Patchy Reception & Counselling

If you are perhaps wanting counselling, the following points may help you decide.

  1. It offers you a room clear of clutter and distraction – space to breathe and relax.
  2. Regular time slots (50-60 minutes) that can be used to off load – kind of scatter thoughts, feelings, experiences into and around that room.
  3. It provides someone who will support, not judge. Part of that support is in helping take control of the panic. Part is in helping you get organised.

If I was to counsel you, I’d combine listening with breathing techniques and other Mindfulness exercises. A new sense of self can grow. Because as your new self becomes less patchy, you could begin to identify your gut instincts – which situations cause panic more than others and how to deal with them yourself.

Take care for now.

Sean