More Than Words – Expressive Art Therapy and Brain Injury

Art Therapy

Hello, all. Hoping you’re okay.

A few months back, I posted a piece about Writing Therapy. But writing is not the only creative form to be used as therapy. Drama, dance, drawing and painting, all can come under the title of Expressive Art Therapy.

I was introduced to it in my third year of training via Natalie Rogers. She’s the daughter of Carl Rogers, and a pioneer in her own right. If you’d like to see her explain her contribution to the Person-Centred approach to counselling, click here.

But the  U.K’s so-called “Father of Art Therapy” was Edward Adamson. Between 1946 and 1981 he worked at Netherne Hospital in Surrey.  It was there he encouraged patients to paint, draw and even sculpt.  He also extended his work througjh the British Red Cross.

Watching Paint Dry

Very academic readers and viewers might like to watch a conference presentation published on Youtube by the Edward Adamson Collection. (Or some of it.) It’s in two parts and called: “Art in the Assylum – Edward Adamson’s Life & Work”. Part 1 (Approx. 30 minutes long) and Part 2 (Just over 30 minutes long.) Those of you less academic WON’T.

General Principles of Expressive Art Therapy
  • Therapy is process focused, rather than systematic
  • The therapist, though qualified and professional, offers support, not authority
  • The client is their own expert
  • Creativity, expression and reflection can lead to positive wellbeing

What do these principles mean?

One, that therapy looks to the client’s experience more than goals and strategies. Two, the therapist does not believe their opinion is more important than the client’s. Three, the therapist trusts the client’s motivation, openness and self realisation. Four, the client’s own way forward is shown through their art.

Art Therapy2

How Expressive Art Therapy Works with Brain Injury

Thinking of the symptoms of brain injury – poor short-term memory, lack of concentration, aphasia or dysphasia, difficulties specifying goals, how can Expressive Art Therapy help?

  1. As the saying goes, “one picture can paint a thousand words” – there is no pressure to mean things with words
  2. The focus is on what’s going on for the client in the moment, so that there is less reliance on memory
  3. Both therapist and client have something tangible to refer to as therapy takes place
  4. The activity of being creative has the potential to increase concentration, planning and other cognitive skills.

But don’t just take my word for it, here are a couple of shorter links:

“Art Therapy Helps Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury” published by NJTV News (3 minutes long)

“Art Therapy Activities: Art Therapy and Brain Injury” published by eHowArtsAndCrafts (2 minutes long)

This is it for July. Take care for now.

 

Busy Doing Nothing

watering holeThere are many pictures used to describe problems around motivation. One that’s used a lot is this: A horse led to water, who refuses to drink. Close to this is the picture of the proverbial “stubborn mule”. Mixing these pictures together, automatically thinking that the horse isn’t drinking because it’s refusing to – that it’s just being a nuiscance for the sake of it, can be a mistake.

Applying “stubborness” to someone with an aquired brain injury can be unfair and misleading. Yes, the person may appear disinterested, may well be unmotivated. But there are two important questions to ask:-

1) Q: What is motivation?

A: “A reason or reasons for acting or behaving in a particular way”. (O.E.D.)

2) Q: What motivates reasoning?

A: Feeling unsafe. Due to hunger, lack of shelter or being cared for, or craving social status.

Fear

NOT being motivated (as some people might see it) might in truth be VERY motivated.

The person “not doing anything” may in truth be doing many things. Things liMotivationke:-

1) Regaining energy after doing what they did yesterday

2) Avoiding standing out from the crowd

3) Stopping themselves making mistakes

4) Avoiding making his or her self see they are unable to do the things they used to in the way they still want to.

5) “Torpor”. Torpor is a tough one. I’m using the word to describe a state of disconnection between something that in the past would have been acted upon but which after their brain injury, there is a present indifference to.

Here’s a link to a vlog entry by a young woman talking through her own problems with motivation: Click here to hear what she has to say.

What’s important to note is her linking stamina to motivation. Her ongoing research is, I think, proof of her personal motivation. She is positive that she WILL achieve what she wants.

Just to end this month’s post, here’s a little story for rescuers and readers finding yourselves stuck. I found it a big help. I hope you do too.

Cocoon

Along a dusty road in India there sat a beggar who sold cocoons.  A young boy watched him day by day.  After some time, the beggar finally beckoned to him.

“Do you know what beauty lies within this chrysalis?  I will give you one so you might see for yourself.  But you must be careful not to handle the cocoon until the butterfly comes out.”

The boy was enchanted with the gift and hurried home to await the butterfly.  He laid the cocoon on the floor and became aware of a curious thing.  The butterfly was beating its fragile wings against the hard wall of the chrysalis until it appeared it would surely perish, before it could break the unyielding prison.  Wanting only to help, the boy swiftly pried the cocoon open.

Out flopped a wet, brown, ugly thing which quickly died.  When the beggar discovered what had happened, he explained to the boy: “In order for the butterfly wings to grow strong enough to support him, it is necessary that he beat them against the walls of his cocoon.  Only by this struggle can his wings become beautiful and durable.  When you denied him that struggle you took away from him his only chance of survival.”

butterfly

May the walls of your cocoon be just thick enough to allow you to struggle just long enough to emerge strong enough.