The Timing of a Tide

I hope this month’s title isn’t too upsetting. I wanted something to convey the whole experience of personality loss. It can be harder to deal with than ordinary bereavement.

Those of you looking after your family member or life-long friend will know. Those of you tasked with caring for someone losing or who has already lost themselves, may find it hard occupying who you’re working with.

Recently, I was approached by a volunteer with a charity that supports Alzheimers patients. She wanted advice on coming up with activities. This month’s post is my response. For her and anyone coping with anyone with dementia symptoms, e.g. via Lewy Bodies (DLB) – a form of Parkinson’s. I hope it helps.

Colour Joy

(I used to know a lovely lady called Joy.)

 

5 Top Tips

1. Shape activities in the here-and-now in ways that match their long-ago.

Activities that mimic what a person used to enjoy physically. If someone used to work for the Post Office, ask them if they’d like to help you sort through paperwork that needs shredding and paper that can go straight into recycling.

Activities that draw on past knowledge. E.g. Maths quizzes using old money.

2. Make activities sensory.

If someone’s attention / perspective comes and goes, conversation is a challenge. Your own sense of engagement with who you care for needs support from them. Resources that stimulate memories or stories can help. E.g. listenning to old 45’s or 12-inch singles together. (I’m assuming you young’uns out there know what they are. Vinyl is back in fashion after all.)

Activities can also be about the look, feel and smell of something. (D’you know there are some people who still prefer the smell of a well thumbed novel to the feel of a Kindle.)

3. Encourage teamwork.

Maintain, or at least slow the loss of social skills. Anything requiring co-operation is good. Discussing methods for doing a jigsaw puzzle (“corners and sky first”, for example) is unnecessary. It is enough to let the picture emerge as you compare and contrast each piece together.

4. Make it physical first… (As far as possible.)

Gentle movement is enough to keep the circulation going; there’s no need for a sweaty workout down the gym’. How about kicking or throwing a giant sponge ball between two, three or four people? If someone is chairbound, they can still join in if they want.

5. Be present

Be prepared to connect with your patient or loved-one’s reality as they perceive it. N.B: I DO mean “as they perceive it”. And be prepared to be persuaded that their way to do something is the better way!

To better understand what an Alzheimer’s personality goes through, here’s another helpful link.

For more general information and assistance about Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, click on the logos below.

alzheimers-logo-desktop

ParkinsonsUK-1b

That’s it for February.

Take care.

More Than Words – Expressive Art Therapy and Brain Injury

Art Therapy

Hello, all. Hoping you’re okay.

A few months back, I posted a piece about Writing Therapy. But writing is not the only creative form to be used as therapy. Drama, dance, drawing and painting, all can come under the title of Expressive Art Therapy.

I was introduced to it in my third year of training via Natalie Rogers. She’s the daughter of Carl Rogers, and a pioneer in her own right. If you’d like to see her explain her contribution to the Person-Centred approach to counselling, click here.

But the  U.K’s so-called “Father of Art Therapy” was Edward Adamson. Between 1946 and 1981 he worked at Netherne Hospital in Surrey.  It was there he encouraged patients to paint, draw and even sculpt.  He also extended his work througjh the British Red Cross.

Watching Paint Dry

Very academic readers and viewers might like to watch a conference presentation published on Youtube by the Edward Adamson Collection. (Or some of it.) It’s in two parts and called: “Art in the Assylum – Edward Adamson’s Life & Work”. Part 1 (Approx. 30 minutes long) and Part 2 (Just over 30 minutes long.) Those of you less academic WON’T.

General Principles of Expressive Art Therapy
  • Therapy is process focused, rather than systematic
  • The therapist, though qualified and professional, offers support, not authority
  • The client is their own expert
  • Creativity, expression and reflection can lead to positive wellbeing

What do these principles mean?

One, that therapy looks to the client’s experience more than goals and strategies. Two, the therapist does not believe their opinion is more important than the client’s. Three, the therapist trusts the client’s motivation, openness and self realisation. Four, the client’s own way forward is shown through their art.

Art Therapy2

How Expressive Art Therapy Works with Brain Injury

Thinking of the symptoms of brain injury – poor short-term memory, lack of concentration, aphasia or dysphasia, difficulties specifying goals, how can Expressive Art Therapy help?

  1. As the saying goes, “one picture can paint a thousand words” – there is no pressure to mean things with words
  2. The focus is on what’s going on for the client in the moment, so that there is less reliance on memory
  3. Both therapist and client have something tangible to refer to as therapy takes place
  4. The activity of being creative has the potential to increase concentration, planning and other cognitive skills.

But don’t just take my word for it, here are a couple of shorter links:

“Art Therapy Helps Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury” published by NJTV News (3 minutes long)

“Art Therapy Activities: Art Therapy and Brain Injury” published by eHowArtsAndCrafts (2 minutes long)

This is it for July. Take care for now.

 

Writing Therapy (Part Two)

Hello everyone.

How many of you, I wonder, challenged yourselves to put something into words? If you did I hope it freed you and was a help to you in some way.

Last month I promised to show how story writing can help organisational skills. Here’s how:

Beginning, Middle and End

Diaries and journals have a “yesterday – today – tomorrow” flow to them. It’s natural. Stories, on the other hand, need to have their beginning chosen. Even if we want to retell something true as fiction, the question has to be asked: “Where did it all start?” Answering and getting our story going therefore requires memory (long-term, usually) and thought.

From then on the questions come in a mix-up that needs sorting: “What happened then?” “What led this person to behave that way?” “Could it have gone differently?” “If something had happened earlier, would it have changed the outcome?” Answering and sorting out the order of all the events and explanations forms the middle.

Endings almost write themselves in a way. Some plots within our stories will have a one way conclusion. And this can also be true of some of our characters. Those who we find reasons to change their minds, become tougher or more relaxed about things, may resolve their adventures in ways they (and we as writers) would not have thought of at the beginning.

All the above is about a true story, even if it’s told as though it’s fiction. What if it’s all a fiction and we are making it up from scratch? It can be as complicated and as much fun as you like.

Creative Writing (2)
Themes, Characters and Genres

By “theme”, I mean topic – an emotional or philosophical one. For example, our story might be our way of figuring out what makes people brave. Or exploring what the world might be like without money.

Obviously, we all know what characters are. But who do we want our characters to be? A few months ago, I introduced you to the Drama Triangle. The Perils of Penelope Pitstop is a good example of this. It has a persecutor (the Hooded Claw), victim (Penelope),  and rescuers (the Ant Hill Mob). And then there are our lesser characters playing their part.

Characters can represent things too. For example, in mythology, the Viking god of storms, Thor, is often shown as quick-tempered and sometimes moody and unpredictable – just like lightening and thunder.

“Genre” is just a posh word for story type – Romance, Comedy, Adventure… Genres can be helpful. If we are exploring bravery, Fantasy might be a really good choice. Think about it. Game of Thrones, The Hobbit, even The Wizzard of Oz all explore bravery. If we think of imagining a world with no money, how about making our story a futuristic Science Fiction story? Or maybe a satirical farce?

Conclusion

Having said all the above, it might be that all we really want to do is tell a good yarn. We have no need to write anything complicated. We just want to tell a simple joke with a few added descriptions about the places and people involved to make it more interesting, more memorable, perhaps.

Perfect. The joke becomes a story. But complicated or simple, there is always a structure and our thinking behind it. And on that note, I’ll leave you with a link to two of my comedy heroes. Haurel & Hardy in “County Hospital”.

Until next month. Take care,

Sean

Writing Therapy (PartOne)

Hello all.

I was talking to someone a couple of weeks ago who once felt they wanted to bring things to an end for themselves. But then he began to write. Not a novel, short story nor a poem; nothing complicated. Just free-flowing words about life with an injured brain.

He got out of his head and onto his computer screen, all his thoughts as they swirled to the front of his awareness again. That done, he read through it.

With all the “c**p” in front of him, he was able to put his thoughts into a kind of order – cutting and pasting, creating a beginning and a middle.

The middle is where he still is. It is a middle made of challenges and support, ups and downs, downs and ups.

He’d stopped after a while. Two weeks ago he began again.

“Writing is something you find really helpful, then,” I observed. “Any idea what it’s doing for you?”

“Do-gooders mean well. But no one else can understand what it’s like being me. It’s hard to explain in any case,” he answered.

Here’s how I see it: A way of stepping out of one’s experience.

How? By taking what’s on the inside, placing it outside, looking back at it all. Uncluttered, one’s mind is free to organise, re-read, check out if it looks/sounds right, re-organise and read again. When it does look/sound right, mixed emotions and confusion have become more understandable.

Dr. Gillie Bolton is a therapist heavilly influential in Writing Therapy circles. Click here to learn her thoughts on its benefits. It’s a publicity video for one of her books, but even so…

Typing is not for everyone. There are packages available out there that can turn speech to text. If the right words don’t come, so what? Comics / graphic novels tell it all in pictures and bubbles.

Writing Therapy

Keeping a diary can be great for compensating for poor memory too. As well as appointments, some people put descriptions of new faces as well as their names. Blessings can be counted, addresses and phone numbers, doodles – anything.

Next month, Part Two with how story writing can help organisational skills and more.

Take care.