More Than Words – Expressive Art Therapy and Brain Injury

Art Therapy

Hello, all. Hoping you’re okay.

A few months back, I posted a piece about Writing Therapy. But writing is not the only creative form to be used as therapy. Drama, dance, drawing and painting, all can come under the title of Expressive Art Therapy.

I was introduced to it in my third year of training via Natalie Rogers. She’s the daughter of Carl Rogers, and a pioneer in her own right. If you’d like to see her explain her contribution to the Person-Centred approach to counselling, click here.

But the  U.K’s so-called “Father of Art Therapy” was Edward Adamson. Between 1946 and 1981 he worked at Netherne Hospital in Surrey.  It was there he encouraged patients to paint, draw and even sculpt.  He also extended his work througjh the British Red Cross.

Watching Paint Dry

Very academic readers and viewers might like to watch a conference presentation published on Youtube by the Edward Adamson Collection. (Or some of it.) It’s in two parts and called: “Art in the Assylum – Edward Adamson’s Life & Work”. Part 1 (Approx. 30 minutes long) and Part 2 (Just over 30 minutes long.) Those of you less academic WON’T.

General Principles of Expressive Art Therapy
  • Therapy is process focused, rather than systematic
  • The therapist, though qualified and professional, offers support, not authority
  • The client is their own expert
  • Creativity, expression and reflection can lead to positive wellbeing

What do these principles mean?

One, that therapy looks to the client’s experience more than goals and strategies. Two, the therapist does not believe their opinion is more important than the client’s. Three, the therapist trusts the client’s motivation, openness and self realisation. Four, the client’s own way forward is shown through their art.

Art Therapy2

How Expressive Art Therapy Works with Brain Injury

Thinking of the symptoms of brain injury – poor short-term memory, lack of concentration, aphasia or dysphasia, difficulties specifying goals, how can Expressive Art Therapy help?

  1. As the saying goes, “one picture can paint a thousand words” – there is no pressure to mean things with words
  2. The focus is on what’s going on for the client in the moment, so that there is less reliance on memory
  3. Both therapist and client have something tangible to refer to as therapy takes place
  4. The activity of being creative has the potential to increase concentration, planning and other cognitive skills.

But don’t just take my word for it, here are a couple of shorter links:

“Art Therapy Helps Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury” published by NJTV News (3 minutes long)

“Art Therapy Activities: Art Therapy and Brain Injury” published by eHowArtsAndCrafts (2 minutes long)

This is it for July. Take care for now.

 

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