Baring Things in Mind (Part Three)

Hello all.

Thank you to those of you who’ve got in touch. It was especially nice to get an email from a fellow counsellor with cerebral palsy. Yes, I agree we should chat more about its impact and on us as practicing therapists. I’d be very happy for this here blog to be a place to come and share.

If you find Neurolations interesting, entertaining, dare I say useful, please do spread the word. How many of us brain injured therapists are there across the U.K? It’d be great to learn how you connect your chosen form of therapy to your brain injury.

That said, I will restate my blog’s other purpose.

You may not be a professional; you may have short-term memory problems, difficulties keeping track of days, appointments, budgeting, knowing who’s who, controlling your reactions and times when strangers think you’re drunk or just plain wierd. Neuronations is also about helping you.

With all of the above in mind, I thought I’d share an idea with you this month. A work-in-progress, really.

I am always interested by close similarities and cross pollinations of psychotherapy approaches. Psychodynamic therapists and analysts talk  of “personas”; cognitive behavioural therapists refer to “schemas” and “models of behaviour”; transactional analysists speak of “ego states”. The list could go on. But let’s keep things interesting.

Can the triune brain  (lizzard, limbic system and neo-cortex together) form the basis of a new way of looking at Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy?

I think it can. But my thinking is only based on my experience. I’m wondering how much of your own experience and concepts you can attach to the triune brain. Today I found a thought provoking video about it on Youtube: “Therapy in a Nutshell”. (Don’t you just love it when Serendipity comes along?) N.B: The video does NOT represent the hard science of how the brain works. It is a SIMPLE WAY OF EXPLAINING the brain and personality working together.

triune triangle

The world already has loads of pyschological ways of dealing with what it is to be human. Does it need another one?

The thing is, I’m not sure if any counselling approach takes physical, neurological injury into account. A whole range of books have been written about emotional and psychological disorders. Entire training sessions are given to learning about depression, eating disorders, addiction, anger management and so on. But much less so the interelatedness of brain injury and personality changes, for example.

Anything that does deal with A.B.I, as far as I’ve found so far, is just concerned with the neurological function of lobes and the effects of damage to them – almost in isolation from the rest of the brain. Useful knowledge in an operating theatre. Not so helpful when someone describes to you the loss of balance caused by loud noise but you cannot sense that with them.

Until next month, take care for now.

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